Understanding Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis

What is Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis? As Parkinson’s Disease progresses, up to 40 percent of the approximately one million Americans...see more living with the illness will develop psychotic symptoms, primarily hallucinations, but also delusions. These symptoms can be an indication of Parkinson’s disease psychosis (PDP), but unfortunately, many patients are not diagnosed. Sometimes, the symptoms of PDP […]

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Pain in Parkinson’s Disease

Pain is an unfortunately common problem in Parkinson’s disease. Of course, pain is common in the general population, especially...see more among older people. A recent American study found that pain affected about twice as many people with Parkinson’s Disease than those of the same age and gender without PD. About 50% of Parkinson’s Disease patients in […]

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Good Days, Bad Days

One of the many issues that Parkinson’s Disease patients often have that no one understands are good days and...see more bad days. So many times, Parkinson’s Disease patients come into the office and the patient or family says, “Today’s a good day, he’s not usually this good at home.” “Today’s a bad day. Usually he can […]

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Diagnosing Parkinson’s Disease

There is no test to diagnose Parkinson’s Disease Although Parkinson’s disease is a specific, well defined disease that can...see more be reliably diagnosed at autopsy, it is defined in life by clinical criteria. This means that the diagnosis rests entirely on the information (history) that the patient provides plus the physical examination. There is no test […]

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Dementia in Parkinson’s Disease

Dementia is an umbrella term that is defined by a decline in memory and cognitive, or thinking, skills to...see more a level that interferes with normal function. It is normal for older people to have more problems remembering names and faces than they had before, but this does not interfere with normal activities in most cases. […]

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Atypical Parkinsonism & Parkinson Plus syndromes

Understanding the differences between Parkinsonism and Parkinson Plus syndromes “Parkinsonism” means “looks like Parkinson’s disease.” To neurologists this means...see more that the person has a somewhat flexed posture, moves slowly, is stiff and usually walks slowly, with small steps and reduced or no arm swing. We call the syndromes “atypical” because they usually differ from Parkinson’s […]

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